April 17, 2014

(Source: batsuit-butt, via stwordsofwisdom)

7:39am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zhksrx1DILkCJ
  
Filed under: startrek star trek 
April 16, 2014
10 Feminist Lessons We Learned From The Women Of "Star Trek"

mollybecameanengineer:

I really enjoyed this article because they chose things that were unique to each character. It is a given that Janeway, Dax, Torres, Kira, and so on, teach us that as women we can excel in traditionally male roles, so I really appreciate the additional insight.

I love B’Elanna Torres’ lesson, ‘Men don’t have to “wear the pants” in a relationship.’ I always loved B’Elanna’s character and her relationship with Tom, but I had never really thought about how much she influenced me as a teenager. Now I realize (15 years later…) that she did teach me that you can be an awesome female engineer with a wonderful, caring husband without loosing who you are (or who he is) in the relationship. And that is it ok that I wear the pants…

11:35pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zhksrx1DGsi6J
  
Filed under: star trek startrek 
April 6, 2014
beauxbradytattoos:

"With the light of truth"

beauxbradytattoos:

"With the light of truth"

9:26am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zhksrx1CGObIq
  
Filed under: straightedge 
April 6, 2014
fuckyeahgreatplays:

FiveThirtyEight was surprised to find, via computer analysis, that Romeo and Juliet speak less to each other than to other characters.

I’m blaming Romeo for this lack of communication. Juliet speaks 155 lines to him, and he speaks only 101 to her. His reticence toward Juliet is particularly inexcusable when you consider that Romeo spends more time talking than anyone else in the play. (He spends only one-sixth of his time in conversation with the supposed love of his life.)
The plays with the most connected lovers seem to be the ones with strong women: “The Taming of the Shrew’s” fiery Katharina, “Macbeth’s” homicidal Lady Macbeth, “The Merchant of Venice’s” brilliant Portia, and “Antony and Cleopatra’s” seductive and defiant Cleopatra. In general, Shakespeare’s female lovers lavish a larger share of their lines on their men than the men do on them. This is true not just of “Romeo and Juliet,” but of “Macbeth,” “The Taming of the Shrew” and all four couples in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The only real exceptions, tellingly, occur in the plays where the women pose as men: “Twelfth Night” and “The Merchant of Venice.” (Antony and Cleopatra spend roughly equal shares of lines on each other.)

The whole article is a fascinating read. There’s even an nifty set of interactive graphs. 


Fascinating.

fuckyeahgreatplays:

FiveThirtyEight was surprised to find, via computer analysis, that Romeo and Juliet speak less to each other than to other characters.

I’m blaming Romeo for this lack of communication. Juliet speaks 155 lines to him, and he speaks only 101 to her. His reticence toward Juliet is particularly inexcusable when you consider that Romeo spends more time talking than anyone else in the play. (He spends only one-sixth of his time in conversation with the supposed love of his life.)

The plays with the most connected lovers seem to be the ones with strong women: “The Taming of the Shrew’s” fiery Katharina, “Macbeth’s” homicidal Lady Macbeth, “The Merchant of Venice’s” brilliant Portia, and “Antony and Cleopatra’s” seductive and defiant Cleopatra. In general, Shakespeare’s female lovers lavish a larger share of their lines on their men than the men do on them. This is true not just of “Romeo and Juliet,” but of “Macbeth,” “The Taming of the Shrew” and all four couples in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The only real exceptions, tellingly, occur in the plays where the women pose as men: “Twelfth Night” and “The Merchant of Venice.” (Antony and Cleopatra spend roughly equal shares of lines on each other.)

The whole article is a fascinating read. There’s even an nifty set of interactive graphs.

Fascinating.

(via bluelineshakespeare)

9:18am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zhksrx1CGMQsi
  
Filed under: shakespeare 
April 3, 2014

redonyellow:

These two scenes remind me of each other because they boldly illustrate how disparate TNG and DS9 were when it came to morality. In TNG, there was often a right answer, and the lines separating what was good and bad were often clear.  While in DS9, the best thing to do was not always the “right” thing to do. DS9 gave you scenarios where you could not judge whether decisions were moral or immoral, leaving you conflicted because they did not fit in those boxes.

Also, I find these scenes are remarkable because they showed how the principles that Starfleet claimed it was built on went out the window when it itself was threatened.

(via fuckyeahstartrek)

April 1, 2014
The Ides of March Madness
A theatre group is organizing a Shakespeare bracket. NPR has an article about it here.

The Ides of March Madness

A theatre group is organizing a Shakespeare bracket. NPR has an article about it here.

9:18am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zhksrx1Bp1QL7
  
Filed under: shakespeare 
March 31, 2014

elric-dewisant:

andrewstuntpilot:

Shakespeare’s Deaths and Murders infographic, by Caitlin Griffin at Drown My Books.

This was sent to me this afternoon by my former English Lit. tutor. File under: classroom wall displays. 

And they say TV is to damn violent…

(via allthingshakespeare)

2:28pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zhksrx1BkLil6
  
Filed under: shakespeare 
March 29, 2014
Five Leadership Lessons From Jean-Luc Picard

I love this.

(Source: fuckyeahstartrek)

6:39pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zhksrx1BZ0ahU
  
Filed under: startrek star trek 
March 28, 2014
Star Trek: Tik Tok

Can’t believe I never posted this before. A Star Trek music video for Kesha’s Tik Tok. This is amazing.

12:59pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zhksrx1BR77ss
  
Filed under: startrek kesha star trek 
March 26, 2014

elsiechristina asked: Thanks very much for your help!:)

You’re very welcome! I’m always happy to help with Shakespeare-related stuff!

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